What's New!

Chat with
Hackers

How to Defend
Your Computer 

The Guides
to (mostly) 
Harmless Hacking

Happy Hacker 
Digests (old stuff) 

Hacker Links 

Hacker
Wargames 

Meet the 
Happy Hacksters 

Help for 
Beginners 

Hacker 
Bookstore 

Humor 

It Sucks 
to Be Me!

How to Commit
Computer Crime (not)! 

What Is a 
Hacker, Anyhow? 

Have a 
Great Life! 

News from the 
Hacker War Front
So you want to be a computer criminal?

____________________________________________________________

GUIDE TO (mostly) HARMLESS HACKING

Computer Crime Law Issue #1

By Peter Thiruselvam <pselvam@ix.netcom.com> and Carolyn Meinel 
____________________________________________________________

In this Guide you will find:

Tired of reading all those “You could go to jail” notes in these guides? Who says those things are crimes? Well, now you can get the first in a series of Guides to the gory details of exactly what laws we’re trying to keep you from accidentally breaking, and who will bust you if you go ahead with the crime anyhow.

This Guide covers the two most important US Federal computer crime statutes: 18 USC, Chapter 47, Section 1029, and Section 1030, known as the “Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986.”

Now these are not the *only* computer crime laws.  It’s just that these are the two most important laws used in US Federal Courts to put computer criminals behind bars.

COMPUTER CRIMES: HOW COMMON? HOW OFTEN ARE THEY REPORTED?

The FBI’s national Computer Crimes Squad estimates that between 85 and 97 percent of computer intrusions are not even detected.  In a recent test sponsored by the Department of Defense, the statistics were startling.  Attempts were made to attack a total of 8932 systems participating in the test. 7860 of those systems were successfully penetrated.  The management of only 390 of those 7860 systems detected the attacks, and only 19 of the managers reported the attacks (Richard Power, -Current and Future Danger: A CSI Primer on Computer Crime and Information Warfare_, Computer Security Institute, 1995.)

The reason so few attacks were reported was “mainly because organizations frequently fear their employees, clients, and stockholders will lose faith in them if they admit that their computers have been attacked.” Besides, of the computer crimes that *are* reported, few are ever solved. 

SO, ARE HACKERS A BIG CAUSE OF COMPUTER DISASTERS?

According to the Computer Security Institute, these are the types of computer crime and other losses: 
· Human errors - 55% 
· Physical security problems - 20%(e.g., natural disasters, power problems) 
· Insider attacks conducted for the purpose of profiting from computer crime - 10% 
· Disgruntled employees seeking revenge - 9% 
· Viruses - 4% 
· Outsider attacks - 1-3%

So when you consider that many of the outsider attacks come from professional computer criminals -- many of whom are employees of the competitors of the victims, hackers are responsible for almost no damage at all to computers.

In fact, on the average, it has been our experience that hackers do far more good than harm.

Yes, we are saying that the recreational hacker who just likes to play around with other people’s computers is not the guy to be afraid of. It’s far more likely to be some guy in a suit who is an employee of his victim. But you would never know it from the media, would you?

(Carolyn's note: This has changed. In 1999, within the US alone, computer crime was estimated to take a $10 billion toll.)

More on computer crime law--->>
________________________________________________________

© 2013 Happy Hacker. All rights reserved. 

Carolyn's most
popular book,
in 4th edition now!
For advanced
hacker studies,
read Carolyn's
Google Groups
Subscribe to Happy Hacker
Email:
Visit this group